Generic Energy Saving Tips in Plants & Refineries | Energy Conservation

Generic Energy Saving Tips in Plants & Refineries | Energy Conservation

  • Steam trap replacement.
  • Condensate recovery.
  • Piping insulation.
  • Boilers and furnaces tuning Compressed air leaks.
  • Preventive maintenance of energy system components such as heat exchangers, pumps, fans, compressors, turbines, furnaces, boilers, and so on.
  • Improved cooling water system optimize BFW pumps load allocation.
  • Use energy management system consider booster, shipper and condensate pumps load management.
  • Consider compressors load management.
  • Use adjustable speed motors/devices for pumps, compressors, etc.
  • Minimize boilers and cooling towers blow downs.
  • Utilize boiler blow-down.
  • Install low NOX burners.
  • Enhance the efficiency of boilers and furnaces through O2 control.
  • Enhance boilers and furnaces insulation.
  • Replace gas turbines with more efficient steam turbines.
  • Increase boiler steam pressure and temperature.
  • Use auxiliary turbines to minimize steam let downs.
  • Use steam in the process instead of venting it.
  • Preheat combustion air.
  • Use adjustable speed drives for boiler feed water pumps.
  • Reduce process variability using stable ops program.
  • Reduce fired heaters excess oxygen.
  • Reduce fired heaters stack temperature.
  • Use the flue gases in process heating.
  • Optimize your waste heat boilers.
  • Recover valuable gases from your fuel gases.
  • Reduce the H2 wheel and Water wheel in your plant.
  • Cool down the inlet temperature to compressors.
  • Reduce cooling medium return temperature in refrigeration cycles.
  • Upgrade, regenerate and replace your catalyst.
  • Optimize let down stations and steam turbine operation.
  • Use highest efficiency turbines.
  • Maintain your steam turbines to reduce steam consumption.
  • Give frequent attention to steam traps and leaks.
  • Replace turbine drives with electric motors.
  • Recover condensate.
  • Thermal Heat and power integration.
  • Better control for dispersion steam to flare stacks.
  • Minimize steam use in strippers.
  • Minimize live steam utilization.
  • Mechanical energy integration.
  • Reduce natural gas consumption by understanding its sources, sinks and constraints.
  • Reduce fuel gas use with energy integration.
  • Keep H2 separate from fuel gas system.
  • Measure the composition of off-gas streams and recover C2 and C3+.
  • Avoid unnecessary processing of off-gas..
  • Avoid unnecessary processing of wastes and inert.
  • Minimize the unnecessary production of off-gas.
  • Avoid unnecessary recycles.
  • Avoid leaks in the pressure relieve valves to the fuel system.
  • Adjust operating pressures and optimize process interaction.
  • Clean and maintain pipelines and valves to minimize pressure drops.
  • Insulate condensate return lines.
  • Treat and recycle blow down to force lower cycles of concentration in cooling towers and boilers.
  • Use lowest quality water.
  • Maximize use of stripped sour water.
  • Minimize generation of wastewater.
  • Seek out and repair all hydrocarbon leaks.
  • Eliminate direct water injection for cooling purposes.
  • Eliminate live steam used for re-boiling and stripping where it is only used for BTU value.
  • Minimize or eliminate live steam consumption in sour water strippers by replacing it with re-boilers.
  • Boiler blow-down could be considered for cooling tower make-up.
  • Cooling tower blow-down should not be treated but segregated to sewer.
  • Boiler blow-down should not be sent to wastewater treatment but segregate to sewer.
  • Use process water effluent as a source on the next lower water quality level.
  • Eliminate live steam usage since it becomes water and follows an energy path through the plant consuming more energy to process it.
  • Should live steam becomes necessary optimize the amount used through pressure manipulation.
  • Use lowest quality water possible for de-Salter operation.
  • Minimize water used in de-Salter.
  • Avoid water slipping through with crude during desalting.
  • Avoid unnecessary processing of off-gas.
  • Avoid unnecessary processing of wastes and inert.
  • Minimize the unnecessary production of off-gas.
  • Use on-line monitoring and advanced process control for furnaces and other control sensitive fuel users.
  • Avoid unnecessary recycles.
  • Avoid leaks in the pressure relieve valves to the fuel system.
  • Adjust operating pressures and optimize process interaction.
  • Clean and maintain pipelines and valves to minimize pressure drops.
  • Insulate condensate-return lines.
  • Treat and recycle blow down to force lower cycles of concentration in cooling towers and boilers.
  • Use lowest quality water.
  • Maximize use of stripped sour water.
  • Minimize generation of wastewater.
  • Seek out and repair all hydrocarbon leaks.
  • Eliminate direct water injection for cooling purposes.
  • Eliminate live steam used for re-boiling and stripping where it is only used for BTU value.
  • Minimize or eliminate live steam consumption in sour water strippers by replacing it with re-boilers.
  • Boiler blow-down could be considered for cooling tower make-up.
  • Cooling- tower blow-down should not be treated but segregated to sewer.
  • Boiler blow-down should not be sent to wastewater treatment but segregate to sewer.
  • Use process water effluent as a source on the next lower water quality level.
  • Should live steam becomes necessary optimize the amount used through pressure manipulation.
  • Use lowest quality water possible for de-Salter operation.
  • Avoid water slipping through with crude during desalting.
  • Minimize the water-wheel in the plant.
  • Watch the steam condensate receivers and report low levels
  • Use equipment hidden capacity especially in heat exchangers, coolers and steam heaters.
  • Use minimum steam pressure whenever possible in heating and recommend bigger surface area to the pinch-steam-pressure heater.
  • Optimize refrigerant sub-cooling using water first before using much colder process streams.
  • Consider multi-stage throttling and sub-cooling.
  • Remember the pumping cost when considering the reduction in compression cost in refrigeration systems.
  • Optimize the pre-cooling/pressure drop in cooling inlet to compressor to avoid excessive pressure drop.
  • Maximizes the utilization of major equipment idle capacities such as gas turbines running big compressors via recommending auxiliary equipment to work in an orchestrated mode.
  • Watch the pressure drop on outlets of pumps and compressors.
  • Check the sizing of your control valves; some valves are better than others.
  • Minimizes the recycles to pumps and compressors.
  • Maximize your heat recovery in heat trains for the more expensive and polluting utility on the expense of cheap and less polluting ones.
  • Determine the cost of compressed air for your plant by periodically monitoring the compressor operating hours and load duty cycle.
  • Use a systems approach while operating and maintaining a compressed air system; periodically clean inter-coolers.
  • Adopt a plant-wide compressed air management policy to cut costs and reduce waste by eliminating inappropriate uses, fixing leaks, and matching system supply with demand.
  • Clean inlet filters to air compressors to reduce pressure drop and power consumption
  • Consider load management for air compressors if the air demand is fluctuating and you have extra capacities with different efficiencies
  • Consider variable speed drives for air compressors
  • Delivered pressure should be kept at minimum and locate pinched demand point for consideration.
  • Consider in situ supply of air via a dedicated compressor at load pinch point or high demand load point.
  • Consider replacing pneumatic tools by electrically operated tools.
  • Consider optimizing your CHP operation using on-line optimizer.

Before concluding this chapter that has been dedicated to process plants operators, it is important to refer to some newly widespread important practices in the industrial community such as equipment load management, in-process power recovery, end-of-pipe flare recovery and equipment integration. Load management for instance, is a practice that is conducted by many plant operators even without on-line or off-line optimization advisory software. It is justified as long as you have an oversized capacity in supply and a fluctuating demand either due to legitimate process reason and/or changes in ambient conditions.


 

Other Info

Document Category Engineering
Document Target Users

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *